chicagobusiness:

Which Chicago-area companies made the cut for this year’s “Best Places to Work”? Here’s the top 5:
No. 1: Centro LLC
No. 2: Tasty Catering Inc.
No. 3: Performics
No. 4: NetApp Inc.
No. 5: Microsoft Corp.
You can check out the rest of the list (and the honorable mentions) here.

chicagobusiness:

Which Chicago-area companies made the cut for this year’s “Best Places to Work”? Here’s the top 5:

You can check out the rest of the list (and the honorable mentions) here.

Why your perks aren’t working: Think perks are the key to a happy workplace? Think again. Human resources leaders say that while perks may sweeten the deal, they won’t necessarily boost employee morale and productivity.
Photo: Justin Sadowski and Joaquin Herrera shoot hoops in Performics’ game room, which also has two big-screen TVs Credit: Erik Unger

Why your perks aren’t workingThink perks are the key to a happy workplace? Think again. Human resources leaders say that while perks may sweeten the deal, they won’t necessarily boost employee morale and productivity.

Photo: Justin Sadowski and Joaquin Herrera shoot hoops in Performics’ game room, which also has two big-screen TVs Credit: Erik Unger

chicagobusiness:

‘New in Chicago’: A social-enterprise incubator, “a Thai town within the city of Chicago” and an organic burger joint where customers sit on old church pews from the South Side and chairs made out of recycled soda bottles. Here’s your weekly startup roundup, featuring Panzanzee, Thai Town Center, Indie Burger, Magic Number and Fibroblast.

chicagobusiness:

‘New in Chicago’: A social-enterprise incubator, “a Thai town within the city of Chicago” and an organic burger joint where customers sit on old church pews from the South Side and chairs made out of recycled soda bottles. Here’s your weekly startup roundup, featuring PanzanzeeThai Town CenterIndie BurgerMagic Number and Fibroblast.

How social media can torpedo your career: Crain’s contributor Nick Harrison shares how his social media behaviors kept him from landing jobs:

About two years ago, while complaining about how clients where hard to come by over lunch with a friend and fellow small-business owner, that friend gave me the greatest gift I could have ever asked for. That friend said to me, “Would you like to take the red pill or the blue pill?”

Confused, I just said, “What?”

My friend’s response: “I can tell you why we didn’t hire you to build our new site, even though you were our first choice. But you aren’t going to like it.”

Of course, I had to know.

The answer was, “Because although you are a friend and I enjoy talking to you on Twitter daily, you are a nut and all over the place on there and I just didn’t feel comfortable trusting you with my business.”

Credit: The Inspiration Room / Flickr

How social media can torpedo your career: Crain’s contributor Nick Harrison shares how his social media behaviors kept him from landing jobs:

About two years ago, while complaining about how clients where hard to come by over lunch with a friend and fellow small-business owner, that friend gave me the greatest gift I could have ever asked for. That friend said to me, “Would you like to take the red pill or the blue pill?”
Confused, I just said, “What?”
My friend’s response: “I can tell you why we didn’t hire you to build our new site, even though you were our first choice. But you aren’t going to like it.”
Of course, I had to know.
The answer was, “Because although you are a friend and I enjoy talking to you on Twitter daily, you are a nut and all over the place on there and I just didn’t feel comfortable trusting you with my business.”
Credit: The Inspiration Room / Flickr

Incubators or accelerators: Are they right for your startup? — Deciding whether to start your business via an incubator or accelerator largely comes down to your personal confidence in your business model, your execution skills and your fundraising skills, writes Crain’s contributor George Deeb.

A real-life example can play up your expertiseIn today’s fast-paced business world, a lot has been written about the importance of elevator speeches and thumbnail descriptions. A brief summary of your expertise is a start. Follow up, however, with a good example.

Making money and making profit is something you have to practice. Just like if you got on the stage for the first time with a violin and you were asked to play something great, you wouldn’t be able to do that unless you’ve been practicing for a while. The idea that startups have a product or something and then one day hope to flip the revenue/profit lever is a pipe dream.
Build a mobile site? Maybe, maybe not…: Crain’s guest contributor Andy Crestodina says it’s important to base mobile development on numbers, not what the competition is doing.
Credit: mobilewebsites.com

Build a mobile site? Maybe, maybe not…Crain’s guest contributor Andy Crestodina says it’s important to base mobile development on numbers, not what the competition is doing.

Credit: mobilewebsites.com

A startup for startups: Catapult Chicago, the city’s latest communal tech-startup space, officially launched today and plans to house 12 to 15 companies in 12,000 square feet on the 25th floor of 321 N. Clark St. Here’s a Q&A with co-founder Ryan Leavitt.

A startup for startupsCatapult Chicago, the city’s latest communal tech-startup space, officially launched today and plans to house 12 to 15 companies in 12,000 square feet on the 25th floor of 321 N. Clark St. Here’s a Q&A with co-founder Ryan Leavitt.

One entrepreneur’s journey from beneficiary to angel investor: Tech entrepreneur-turned-investor Shawn Riegsecker understands the value of an angel investor firsthand because his own company relied on one.
Photo: "We would much rather invest our … wealth into (startups)," says Shawn Riegsecker, "than in a blue-chip, slow-growth stock." Credit: Erik Unger

One entrepreneur’s journey from beneficiary to angel investorTech entrepreneur-turned-investor Shawn Riegsecker understands the value of an angel investor firsthand because his own company relied on one.

Photo: "We would much rather invest our … wealth into (startups)," says Shawn Riegsecker, "than in a blue-chip, slow-growth stock." Credit: Erik Unger